How NOT To Play Cricket

Queensland Cricket

Case Study

Challenge

With the summer season on the way, Queensland Cricket aims to encourage young girls to try cricket.

Audience

Young girls interested in sports sign-ups. 10-15 years old.

Execution

We juxtaposed an old-time British narrator against modern female cricket players kicking ass to show how the game of cricket has changed over the centuries.

Outcomes

By blending beautiful imagery with real game footage with fast-paced editing, the final video shows a fun and attention-grabbing side of cricket.

Results

Queensland Cricket will use this as the highlight of their 'That's My Game' campaign, sharing on their social media channels and at Queensland school assemblies.

How We Did It

No matter how much you may love cricket, let's admit: it can be boring sometimes. Especially to young girls who have never played before. But this 'gentlemen's game' has seen massive shifts in recent years and is now a sport that can be played by everyone.

Working closely with the team at Queensland Cricket, we developed the concept to present the old and new styles of cricket. Our goal was to recognise that cricket is a heritage sport with a long tradition, however with modern players and modern styles, the game is being changed to be more inclusive and diverse. Yes, the Laws of Cricket is real code of conduct for the sport, but it was written in 1788 so it's probably time for an update.

Bringing the British charm, Tristan Teller found the perfect balance of 'empire English' and 'modern cricket commentator'. His character represents an old cricket audience who are learning there's a new way to play with is... ahem... rather smashing.

With the popularity of WBBL and Brisbane Heat being double-defending champions, we used these athletes to show our young audience that the game is changing. Cricket doesn't have to be boring - least of all when you're the one playing.

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